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Type 1 diabetes may be your reason

Did you know that Tresiba® is the only long-acting insulin that can be taken by children as young as 1 year of age with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes? If you or your child have diabetes, ask about Tresiba®.

What's my type?

See the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes

TYPE 1

An autoimmune disorder (your body makes little or no insulin because of an overactive immune system)

5%-10% of people (adults and children) with diabetes have type 1

Treatment must include insulin

TYPE 2

A metabolic disorder (your body prevents the insulin it makes from working correctly and/or may not make enough insulin)

90%-95% of people (adults and children) with diabetes have type 2

Treatments may include insulin

Tresiba® as part of a basal-bolus insulin therapy

People with diabetes may need help controlling blood sugar with 2 insulins:

  • A long-acting (basal) insulin controls blood sugar between meals and during sleep. Tresiba® is a long-acting insulin
  • A fast-acting (bolus) insulin controls blood sugar when you eat. This kind of insulin is often called mealtime insulin. Learn about a mealtime insulin option from Novo Nordisk »

If you have type 1 diabetes, your treatment plan will include basal-bolus insulin therapy, which uses both insulins to closely mimic the body’s normal insulin release.

Diabetes care basics

Manage your type 1 diabetes in these 4 areas

Healthy eating
Healthy eating

Healthy eating

If you or your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll want to keep track of foods eaten and adjust insulin dosing accordingly. Your health care team can help you forge a plan for healthy eating that works.

Physical activity
Physical activity

Being active

Physical activity gives you more energy and makes your body more sensitive to insulin. With type 1 diabetes it’s important to monitor blood sugar with activity and keep “emergency carbs” on hand, like fruit juice, glucose tablets, or hard candies.

Taking insulin
Taking insulin

Taking insulin

If you have type 1 diabetes, you have likely been prescribed basal-bolus insulin therapy that includes both a long-acting (basal) insulin like Tresiba® and a rapid-acting (bolus) insulin for mealtimes. See how to take Tresiba®.

Tracking blood sugar
Tracking blood sugar

Tracking blood sugar

You’ll need to closely track your blood sugar level if you have type 1 diabetes. Your health care team will explain when and how often to check blood sugar. Download a blood sugar diary or an app to help stay on track.

Resources for caregivers

Find support for managing your child’s diabetes

If your child has been diagnosed with diabetes, here are resources that may help you both learn how to manage it:

Get information on caring for a child with diabetes and navigating your new lifestyle with the Caring for Someone with Type 1 Diabetes brochure

Sign up for free online support through Cornerstones4care

Sign up for free support and information, including helpful emails and one-on-one calls with a Certified Diabetes Educator

As a caregiver, you can help your child develop a positive attitude toward a condition that they may have to manage their entire life.

Charlie Kimball's story

The first licensed INDYCAR driver with type 1 diabetes

Charlie Kimball was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 5 years into his professional racing career. Today Charlie prepares for his races by watching what he eats, exercising, and using Tresiba® as prescribed by his doctor to help control his blood sugar for a full 24 hours, along with a mealtime insulin.

Charlie Kimball is a paid spokesperson for Novo Nordisk.
Carlin Racing is sponsored by Novo Nordisk.

The first licensed INDYCAR driver with type 1 diabetes

Charlie Kimball was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 5 years into his professional racing career. Today Charlie prepares for his races by watching what he eats, exercising, and using Tresiba® as prescribed by his doctor to help control his blood sugar for a full 24 hours, along with a mealtime insulin.

Charlie Kimball is a paid spokesperson for Novo Nordisk.
Carlin Racing is sponsored by Novo Nordisk.

Icon Around The Clock

Full 24-hour control

With Tresiba®, Charlie gets 24-hour blood sugar control with powerful A1C reduction. He also works hard to manage his diabetes day to day through diet and exercise.

Get some daily management tips »

Icon Steering Wheel

Handling on and off the track

Charlie may drive fast, but he needs his long-acting insulin to release slow and steady throughout the day like the body’s insulin does.

See how Tresiba® works »

Icon Team of People

Support to stay on track

As part of his care plan, Charlie depends on a supportive team to help him manage his diabetes. You can get free support and help with Tresiba®, too.

Sign me up »

The #23 on Charlie's car represents the year 1923, when the 1st of 2 Danish companies that merged to create Novo Nordisk was founded—and insulin was produced for the first time.

The #23 on Charlie's car represents the year 1923, when the 1st of 2 Danish companies that merged to create Novo Nordisk was founded—and insulin was produced for the first time.

Track Charlie on Twitter

Charlie Kimball interacts with and keeps his fans regularly updated through @racewithinsulin.

Selected Important Safety Information

Do not share your Tresiba® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Who should not take Tresiba®?

Do not take Tresiba® if you:

  • are having an episode of low blood sugar
  • are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® 

Before taking Tresiba® , tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements

Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it.

How should I take Tresiba®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to
  • Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units
  • Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to

What is Tresiba®?

  • Prescription Tresiba® is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children who are 1 year of age and older with diabetes
  • Tresiba® is not for people with diabetic ketoacidosis
  • It is not known if Tresiba® is safe and effective in children under 1 year of age
  • Tresiba® is available in 2 concentrations: 200 units/mL and 100 units/mL

Important Safety Information

Do not share your Tresiba® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Who should not take Tresiba®?

Do not take Tresiba® if you:

  • are having an episode of low blood sugar
  • are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba®

Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements

Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it.
 

How should I take Tresiba®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to
  • Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units
  • Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to
  • Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®:
    • Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule
    • Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses
  • If children miss a dose of Tresiba®:
    • Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba®
  • For children who need less than 5 units of Tresiba® each day, use a Tresiba® U-100 vial
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them
  • Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give them a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them
  • Never inject Tresiba® into a vein or muscle
  • Never use a syringe to remove Tresiba® from the FlexTouch® pen

What should I avoid while taking Tresiba®?

  • Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how Tresiba® affects you
  • Do not drink alcohol or use prescription or over-the-counter medicines that contain alcohol

What are the possible side effects of Tresiba®?

Tresiba® may cause serious side effects that can be life-threatening, including:

  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs and symptoms that may indicate low blood sugar include anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache
  • Low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia)
  • Heart failure in some people if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). This can happen even if you have never had heart failure or heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Tresiba®. Tell your health care provider if you have any new or worse symptoms of heart failure including shortness of breath, tiredness, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain

Your insulin dose may need to change because of change in level of physical activity or exercise, increased stress, change in diet, weight gain or loss, or illness.

Common side effects may include reactions at the injection site, itching, rash, serious allergic reactions (whole body reactions), skin thickening or pits at the injection site (lipodystrophy), weight gain, and swelling of your hands and feet.

Get emergency medical help if you have trouble breathing, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, swelling of your face, tongue, or throat, sweating, extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion.

Please click here for Tresiba® Prescribing Information.

Look up your cost and a savings offer at MyTresibaCost.com.

Tresiba® is a prescription medication.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1‑800-FDA-1088.

If you need assistance with prescription costs, help may be available. Visit www.pparx.org or call 1‑888-4PPA-NOW.

Talk to your health care provider about your diabetes management plan, including diet and exercise.