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Tips to stay on track with your diabetes care plan

Whether you have taken another insulin or are just starting insulin, understanding how to manage your diabetes is the key to reaching your diabetes goals. The right tools and the right knowledge can help you get there, one day at a time.

Healthy eating

Make smart, nutritious choices

Read food labels

Read food labels.

You’ll want to pay attention to serving size and carbohydrates when managing your blood sugar. Join Cornerstones4Care® and find nutritional values with a helpful food lookup tool. Sign up today!


Look for healthier foods

Look for healthier foods.

Try to choose foods that have less refined sugar and simple carbohydrates. Keep in mind that a sugar-free product may have the same amount of carbohydrate grams as its standard version.


Man and woman preparing a healthy meal and controlling portions

Control portions.

Check food labels to see the ideal portion size, as it could be less than you usually eat. Be sure to compare the serving size with total servings. The sizes on the label may not be the same as those in your meal plan.


A dietitian can help you create a meal plan that includes more healthy options to fit your lifestyle.

Staying active

Get some physical activity every day

Exercise doesn’t have to be overwhelming

Activities like walking the dog, cleaning the house, and washing the car can be part of your daily exercise routine. When you are active, your cells become more sensitive to insulin, so the insulin can work more efficiently. Exercising, even in smaller increments, can help lower blood sugar and improve your A1C.

For example, you could:

  • Replace a coffee break with going for a walk
  • Walk around while on the phone instead of staying seated
  • Use the stairs at work instead of the elevator
  • Stretch while watching TV instead of lounging

For more support, talk with your health care provider who can recommend good ways to stay active.

Blood sugar tips

Stay on top of your blood sugar with these tips and tools

Check in before you get active

Talk to your health care provider about your exercise routine. Depending on your level of physical activity, you may need to make changes to your diabetes care plan or adjust the amount of medicine you take.

Physical activity and low blood sugar

Sometimes exercise can cause low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. Carry a snack or glucose tablets in case your blood sugar gets too low while being active.

Signs and symptoms to watch out for

Knowing the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar is an important part of managing your diabetes. Be sure to talk with your health care provider if you’re concerned about low blood sugar.

Track your progress

Log your blood sugar numbers to share with your health care provider

24/7 support

Get help managing your diabetes and taking Tresiba®

Managing diabetes is a team effort. And we have a caring team of Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) waiting to assist you! Sign up for a free support program that offers one-on-one calls with a CDE to help you start off right on Tresiba®, along with personalized online tools and tips to help you meet your diabetes goals.

Working with a CDE

A Certified Diabetes Educator can help you develop the skills to successfully manage your diabetes day in and day out.

When you have a Tresiba® prescription, you will have access to one-on-one telephone calls with a CDE. You may request to be contacted by a CDE or you can call 1-877-246-8910 to talk to a CDE from 9 AM to 6 PM (ET) Monday – Friday.

Check out the Tresiba® Facebook page for more ways to manage your diabetes.

Selected Important Safety Information

Do not share your Tresiba® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Who should not take Tresiba®?

Do not take Tresiba® if you:

  • are having an episode of low blood sugar
  • are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® 

Before taking Tresiba® , tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements

Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it.

How should I take Tresiba®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to
  • Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units
  • Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to

What is Tresiba®?

  • Prescription Tresiba® is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children who are 1 year of age and older with diabetes
  • Tresiba® is not for people with diabetic ketoacidosis
  • It is not known if Tresiba® is safe and effective in children under 1 year of age
  • Tresiba® is available in 2 concentrations: 200 units/mL and 100 units/mL

Important Safety Information

Do not share your Tresiba® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them.

Who should not take Tresiba®?

Do not take Tresiba® if you:

  • are having an episode of low blood sugar
  • are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba®

Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements

Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it.
 

How should I take Tresiba®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to
  • Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units
  • Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to
  • Adults - If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba®:
    • Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule
    • Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses
  • If children miss a dose of Tresiba®:
    • Call the healthcare provider for information and instructions about checking blood sugar levels more often until the next scheduled dose of Tresiba®
  • For children who need less than 5 units of Tresiba® each day, use a Tresiba® U-100 vial
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them
  • Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give them a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them
  • Never inject Tresiba® into a vein or muscle
  • Never use a syringe to remove Tresiba® from the FlexTouch® pen

What should I avoid while taking Tresiba®?

  • Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how Tresiba® affects you
  • Do not drink alcohol or use prescription or over-the-counter medicines that contain alcohol

What are the possible side effects of Tresiba®?

Tresiba® may cause serious side effects that can be life-threatening, including:

  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs and symptoms that may indicate low blood sugar include anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache
  • Low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia)
  • Heart failure in some people if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs). This can happen even if you have never had heart failure or heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Tresiba®. Tell your health care provider if you have any new or worse symptoms of heart failure including shortness of breath, tiredness, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain

Your insulin dose may need to change because of change in level of physical activity or exercise, increased stress, change in diet, weight gain or loss, or illness.

Common side effects may include reactions at the injection site, itching, rash, serious allergic reactions (whole body reactions), skin thickening or pits at the injection site (lipodystrophy), weight gain, and swelling of your hands and feet.

Get emergency medical help if you have trouble breathing, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, swelling of your face, tongue, or throat, sweating, extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion.

Please click here for Tresiba® Prescribing Information.

Look up your cost and a savings offer at MyTresibaCost.com.

Tresiba® is a prescription medication.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1‑800-FDA-1088.

If you need assistance with prescription costs, help may be available. Visit www.pparx.org or call 1‑888-4PPA-NOW.

Talk to your health care provider about your diabetes management plan, including diet and exercise.